Backpacking the Appalachian Trail
Scott Janz December 13, 2016 5

The Truth about Mentally Preparing for Long Distance Hike

When I set out to Thru-Hike the entire Appalachian Trail in 2003, one of the things I first did was get in shape. I mean, you are walking over 2,000 miles up and down every day right? However, not that long into my hike I realized I wasn’t battling the physical part of it. Although, (and let me be brutally honest here), I hurt like nobody’s business the first four weeks. What really took me by surprise was the mental part of the hike. The loneliness, isolation, being wet all the time, being hot all the time, being cold all the time. One could say it’s physical, but the mental hardiness is as important as the physical part of your long distance hike.

There are two dominant schools of thought when it comes to the necessity of physical conditioning before a long distance hike. The first one asserts that the only way to prepare the body for the rigors of hauling a heavy pack up and down mountains is to haul a heavy pack up and down mountains. This being the case, the long distance hiker simply limits mileage and duration for the first few weeks, slowly increasing both as the body adjusts, increases its fitness, and hardens. You will get in shape as you go. No doubt about it. I prepared physically, but nothing does it compare to when you are actually out there.

My recommendation is: Do your best to prepare physically. Take your time in the beginning. You are NOT in a race and hike your OWN hike. Getting to know your gear before you go is VERY important. Practice a number of weekend trips before you carry a pack up and down mountains. Do you know how to pack your backpack up in a pouring rain without getting your sleeping bag wet. Nothing will give you the mental shit’s than knowing you’ll be sleeping in the wet spot tonight. Know your Gear!

The truth is — I’ve been backpacking for years and I’m still learning and five to six months is a long time to hike in the backcountry. You will be hot, cold, tired, wet, lonely, and scared. You will itch, ache, and smell bad. The smell bad part is a huge one by the way. You will be hungry all the time. You will get homesick. After awhile, hiking becomes your job, and you’ll be bored. You’ll want to quit. The hardest part of completing a thru-hike is knowing you don’t have to. No one is making you hike day after day. You can go home anytime. The trick is to keep that far-away goal in the back of your mind while focusing only on the immediate day’s hike. Don’t think of hiking 2,000 miles; the longest trail is just a series of week-long hikes. From one town to the next. Rest. One day at a time. Just this next climb. Beating the Mental breakdown is keeping a positive attitude about why your hiking in the first place. It can be a journey where you will meet and become friends with people from all different parts of the world. You will see the beauty of the trail and what it brings YOU. Laugh when you hurt, smile when you smell, and enjoy it. You may only get one change to hike your long distance hike.

My recommendation: Bring your Ipod and regularly download new songs to listen to at camp. Laugh at yourself. Don’t be seduced by town you are re-supplying in. Have all new clothes brought you to half way in. This gives you a good feeling and reduces the odor you’ve been hiking in for awhile. Stay in contact with others and let them be inspired by you. They may be living vicariously through you.

Mix up your food choices. I seriously could eat anything out there and still be hungry. However, I became sick of freeze dried food out there. I started buying pre-cooked food and started cooking gourmet. Was the food heavier, yea a little, but I really enjoyed cooking it. Spaghetti, sauce, sausage was eaten a lot on the trail.

THE BIG TIP: Don’t buy ANY BOOKS, OR BELIEVE ANYTHING YOU HEAR Before you’re Thru-Hike. IT’S YOUR EXPERIENCE AND YOURS ALONE. Nobody can tell you how to psychologically prepare. They think different than you and everyone’s experience on the trail is different. Sure, they can give you some pointers, and some advice, but in the end all your planning will probably go out the window anyway.

If I had to instill one thing in a new backpacker or a wanna be Thru-Hiker (AT or PCT) makes no difference, is this: BE GRATEFUL YOU ARE EVEN OUT THERE. Gratefulness when it sucks the most will be your most important piece of gear. And nobody can teach you that.

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5 Comments

  • pub hikes

    Knowing that there’s a good drink at the end of the hike helps!

    • 12:03 pm - March 13, 2012

  • Admin

    Absolutely!!!!

    • 12:05 pm - March 13, 2012

  • Paul Sheehan

    Truth be told I don’t do much. I keep the first two weeks out on the trial to no more than 12 miles a day, often 10. A month in I start to add about 1 pound of gear I did not have before and don’t go above 5 pounds of my starting out load. My start weight is between 20 and 25 pounds. When winter hits my cold weather gear adds about another 5 pounds. I just keep my pack and hike simple. I use hiking poles and never push it, why would I?

    • 3:11 pm - March 13, 2012

  • HikingDiva

    Whenever I’m tackling something new or daunting, I try to get as much insight from others, so I won’t duplicate their errors (make new ones!)

    My mantra is always “forward motion”. Even if they are baby steps, or I have taken steps backward to move forward in a dfferent direction – I keep repeating “forward motion”. It helps me get past physical impairments as well.

    I find something to celebrate as an acomplishment every day – it may be absolutely miniscule, but it will be recognized. I also find something I’ve learned new each day. Lastly, encouraging others not only distracts you from your own “stuff”, but pays it forward in that Karma account.

    • 6:33 pm - March 13, 2012

  • Paul Sheehan

    HikingDiva has the right attitude + not killing yourself. Those baby steps will take you a lot farther than most people will give them credit for.

    • 5:09 pm - March 17, 2012