Tag: backpacking

TheBackPacker November 3, 2016 0

Episode 8: Why Trust the Trail

In Episode 8: Scott and Ariane share why their podcast is called Trust the Trail. When things go wrong in the wilderness why trusting nature is to your benefit. More importantly, trusting that the trail will give you everything that you are looking for when backpacking and more.

Also, a huge thank to our listeners. We really appreciate all the support and e-mails. Keep them coming.

Highlights:

Ariane forgets tent poles, Oh Oh!

Scott ask’s the universe for a 3 Musketeer’s Bar…and get’s one

Do more with less

The Trail provides if you have a good mental attitude

Have a trail story? Leave a comment and let us know. In the meantime, Trust the Trail.

TheBackPacker September 10, 2016 0

Oregon’s PCT

We love fun backpacking video’s, and this is one of them. (Especially when there is dancing involved) Claire Stam puts together a great expression of backpacking in this section of the Pacific Crest Trail.

From near Siskiyou Summit (elev. 4,310?) in southern Oregon to the Washington border, this section is both the shortest and the easiest to hike or ride. Oregon’s Cascade Range is a subdued volcanic landscape, with a gentle crest that is fairly constant in elevation. The highest point in Oregon is an unnamed saddle (elev. 7,560?) north of Mount Thielsen. Other volcanoes, including Mount McLoughlin, Mount Mazama (Crater Lake), Diamond Peak, the Three Sisters, Mount Washington, Three Fingered Jack, Mount Jefferson and Mount Hood, punctuate the skyline. The only major elevation change in Oregon is the 3,160 foot drop into the Columbia River Gorge crossing Interstate 84 and the Columbia River on the Bridge of the Gods (elev. 180?).

Source: http://www.pcta.org/discover-the-trail/geography/oregon/

If you have a hiking/backpacking or a adventure video you would like to share, let us know. We love sharing your outdoor videos. Drop us a line a admin@thebackpacker.tv

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Scott Janz September 7, 2016 2

To Carry or Not to Carry the Bear Canister

Bear Canisters and the governing rule to carry them in some wilderness areas and on some parts of our National Park Trails has come to some debate recently. Are they working to keep Bears from associating people (backpackers) with food?  Each governing  agencies have different rules regarding their canister requirements in different parts of the backcountry. National Park Service, or Federal Wilderness Agencies each can post different requirements. For example: On some parts of the Appalachian Trail, Thru-Hikers are required to carry a Bear Canister IF you camp on that section of the AT. While in other Wilderness Area’s you are required to carry a Bear Canister at all times.

The question then is: Are Bear Canisters really necessary in order to protect your food, protect the bear, and protect the next backcountry user? In our opinion the answer is “NO”. We think we could make them obsolete if everyone practiced “wildlife avoidance” techniques and mastered the hanging your food bag the right way. Of course Bear Canisters were specially made so that novice backpackers could keep their food safe and have hopefully keeping a Bear alive.

Bear Canisters for obvious reasons are made and enforced to protect the BEAR, NOT YOU. After all, if a “problem Bear” get’s into your food or challenges you for your food, more than likely that bear is a dead bear. YOU on the other hand hike out hungry and probably a little scared, but alive.  All to often (especially in the Smokies) do we hear that Bears have been put down for being too aggressive for food. Which raises a different debate: Are Bears starting to learn that people in the backcountry equals food for THEM? YIKES!

The worst we witness for “wildlife avoidance” is seen on a regular basis at AT Trail Shelters. They are literally becoming a den of garbage with food everywhere. Which is why I NEVER camp in them anymore. Here are a few tips to practice “Wildlife Avoidance”.

We looked for some good tips on “wildlife/bear avoidance” and found a great article by Andrew Skurka:

Food protection techniques in bear country

“DON’T camp where you cook. Cook at least a few hundred yards away from your campsite, downwind, preferably in an airy area where there is a gentle breeze to disperse the scents.

DON’T camp in established sites or near popular trails. The bears live in the backcountry (duh!), and they know exactly where their “neighbors” live. And in heavy-use areas, it is more likely that a previous backcountry user has acted improperly and encouraged problem bear behavior (e.g. by leaving trash at their campsite, or leaving food unprotected on a log while they went to get water or watch the sunset). Bears are more likely to visit these areas regularly because they know their odds of obtaining an easy meal are better.

TRY and camp in un-designated, non-established sites. However, make sure you practice LNT and cover up your camp area when you pack up. When the bears make their evening “rounds,” they are less likely to come across you. If you are in an area where camping in designated areas is required (e.g. Glacier, the Smokies and Yellowstone National Parks), this is sometimes not possible, but thankfully there is usually good food-protection infrastructure at these sites.

CARRY food in odor-proof bags. These bags (such as the OP Sacks from Watchful Eye Designs) will help make me “invisible” to the bears.

DISPOSE YOUR TRASH ASAP. Bears have a great nose. Your trash smells and lingers odors. Again, having a Odor-proof bags for trash is a good idea also, and make sure you constantly are disposing trash regularly.”

DO NOT THINK that throwing your trash in the fire is preventing wildlife from eating your garbage. My domesticated Dog goes right to the fire pit every time we go backpacking. If my dog knows the smell of food in the fire pit so does every other wildlife that lives there. Burning your trash is bad for the environment and doesn’t work to deter bear encounters. I had a Bear right behind me one time savaging through another fire pit. Also, don’t think that just because you are caring a Bear Canister that you are safe from Bears getting into your stuff. If you are cooking next to your tent, with your Bear Canister right next to you, what difference does it make that you have a Bear Canister?  The Bear (who smells the food soaked into your nylon tent) will just make a grab for your tent. Sometimes with you in it. They’ll also (often) carry off your backpack also. But hey! your food will be safe I guess. 🙂

Having said all that: My take on canisters is this… They are heavy, bulky, expensive, and they are uncomfortable to carry their cylindrical shape that fits awkwardly in small packs. Andrew Skurka

We agree! Canisters would be unnecessary if everyone practiced the “wildlife avoidance” techniques described above and mastered the (video) PCT Bear Hang Method.

We need to be good stewards of our outdoor environment. Which means protecting wildlife from being put down because you were too lazy to cook away from a Shelter or Tent. We have it in our control to eliminate the need for Bear Canisters if we want to. Bears are usually the victims of the “food” issues. But practicing good habits, also protect your food from Mice, Raccoons, Marmot, and all other little pesky creatures lurking for YOUR food in the night.

Let us know what you think?

TheBackPacker August 18, 2016 0

How to Love Backpacking in the Rain

We love the videos that come from Dave Collins at www.cleverhiker.com Of course when we see on that strikes at the very heart of being outdoors, we just have to share. The most common question we get when we take newbies out in the backcountry is “what  happens if it rains”?. We always answer that with a tiny grin and say “You get wet”.  I think Dave got it exactly right.

Backpacking in the rain isn’t everyone’s idea of a fantastic time in the woods. It’s going to be wet, cold, and visibility will be greatly reduced. 

If you’re not properly prepared, backpacking in the rain can be all-out miserable. But if you’re ready for it, backpacking in the rain can actually be a lot of fun. 

When conditions are wet you’ll be able to avoid the crowds, you’ll probably see more wildlife, and you’ll be able to experience wilderness areas in completely different way.

Being good at backpacking in the rain is a skill that takes years of practice. The more time you spend doing it, the better you’ll get. 

It’s a good idea to practice close to home at first, so you can hone your skills before heading out on a more extreme trip. 

One of the most important factors to having a good time during a rainy backpacking trip is having a positive attitude. 

If you’re mentally prepared to be wet and still have fun, you’ll probably have a great time. You can sing, and dance to keep warm, or bring fun games to play in your tent. 

One concept that’s tough for beginners to accept is that, if it rains for an extended period of time on your trip, you’re going to get wet, and there’s really no avoiding it. 

Waterproof gear will keep the water out, but it also forms a barrier that holds your body heat in, which leads to condensation and increased perspiration. 

Even the most expensive and breathable rain gear won’t keep your body completely dry while you hike in extended rain. 

The same is true of waterproof shoes. Waterproof shoes don’t breath well and your feet will sweat while you hike. 

When it rains, water from brush along the trail will run down your legs and into your shoes. 

Gaiters and rain pants can delay the effect, but eventually, your feet are going to be soaked one way or another. 

Rather than trying to prevent getting wet, it’s better to just accept that you’re going to get wet and learn how to best adapt to it. 

With the right skills, you can still stay warm, hike comfortably, and have completely dry evenings, even during days of nonstop rain. 

Thanks Dave!